Trials

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Capital One Analyst Faces 2 Years For Insider Trading

    A former Capital One data analyst was sentenced to two years in prison after pleading guilty to his role in a complex $3.1 million scheme to use his employer's credit card transaction data to guess revenue numbers public companies were poised to announce.

  • February 22, 2024

    Supertramp Royalties Deal 'Smart Move,' Doors' Manager Says

    The manager of The Doors and Jefferson Airplane testified Thursday in a California federal breach of contract trial between former Supertramp members that the songwriting royalty agreement at the center of the case looks like a "smart move" and that songwriters often share royalty proceeds with non-writing band members.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Denies Knowing Of Bribes, As Trial Nears End

    Counsel for a former Vitol Group executive told a New York federal jury in closing arguments Thursday that his client wasn't aware of bribes being paid to officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to obtain $500 million in state contracts, while a prosecutor insisted that the former oil trader was the linchpin to the corruption scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Seeks $1.2M In Damages For Debt Collector's Errors

    A debt collection company should pay more than $1.2 million after it "didn't even come close to complying with the law" while recovering medical debt payments for a hospital in Washington, the state attorney general's office told a judge during a bench trial Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Pool Co. Used Rival's TM To Confuse Customers, NC Jury Told

    A swimming pool equipment manufacturer is using a competitor's trademarks to try to pass off its replacement parts on Amazon as being endorsed by its rival, a North Carolina federal jury heard Thursday during opening statements of a trial in Charlotte.

  • February 22, 2024

    5th Circ. Affirms Medicare Kickback Convictions

    The Fifth Circuit upheld two Texas group-home owners' convictions and sentences for their role in a Medicare kickback scheme, rejecting their argument that a trial court judge wrongly admitted audio recordings at trial and incorrectly calculated the scheme's returns.

  • February 22, 2024

    R. Kelly Fights Chicago Child Porn Conviction At 7th Circ.

    R. Kelly's bid to unwind his conviction and 20-year sentence on child pornography and inducement charges received skepticism Thursday from one Seventh Circuit judge, who at one point warned the artist could be "worse off" by winning his appeal.

  • February 22, 2024

    Coldwell Banker Wins Trade Secrets Fight On Directed Verdict

    A California state judge issued a directed verdict for Coldwell Banker's Orange County division in a case where a rival real estate company accused it of poaching employees and stealing trade secrets.

  • February 22, 2024

    Was Armorer 'Sloppy' Or 'Scapegoat'? 'Rust' Trial Opens

    An attorney for film prop weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed told a New Mexico state jury during opening statements in her involuntary manslaughter trial Thursday that the producers of "Rust," including actor Alec Baldwin, used the young armorer as a "scapegoat" in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer.

  • February 22, 2024

    $10M Crash Verdict Nixed Over Excluded Toxicology Expert

    A Texas appeals court on Thursday vacated a $10 million verdict against a truck driver in a wrongful death suit, saying the trial court wrongly excluded expert testimony about the other driver's blood alcohol content and how it could have contributed to the crash.

  • February 22, 2024

    FTC Eyes 2024 Trial For Meta Antitrust Case

    The Federal Trade Commission told a D.C. federal court its case accusing Meta Platforms Inc. of monopolizing the personal social networking market could be ready for trial later this year, despite the company saying the case is too complex to start that soon.

  • February 22, 2024

    Convicted Chicago Pol Seeks Acquittal Or New Trial

    One of Chicago's longest serving and most powerful local politicians asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to set aside a jury's December verdict convicting him of using his official position to steer tax business to his personal law firm, saying no rational jury could have convicted him based on the evidence presented at trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ex-KPMG Exec, Ex-Oversight Staffer Get Convictions Vacated

    A New York federal judge has vacated the convictions and guilty pleas of an ex-KPMG executive and a former member of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in a scheme to use stolen confidential information to help the auditing firm get better results on audits conducted by the regulatory board.

  • February 21, 2024

    Nurses Ignored Surgery Patient's Fatal Sepsis, Fla. Jury Hears

    Nurses at Florida's Bayport Medical Center neglected a post-op patient as she developed sepsis and eventually died in the ICU, and one nurse revised notes to conceal the negligence, jurors heard in opening arguments Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Told Sonos Ruling Treads On Patent Owners' Rights

    A consortium of patent lawyers and small startups are sounding the alarm at the Federal Circuit over a ruling last year from U.S. District Judge William Alsup that threw out a patent lawsuit from speaker maker Sonos for being too "sad," "ancient" and "wrong" to hold up in his court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Supertramp's Ex-Drummer Says Royalty Deal Was For Good

    Supertramp's former drummer took the stand Wednesday in a breach of contract suit he and two other former band members brought against co-songwriter Roger Hodgson, telling a California federal jury that a 1977 agreement for all members to receive a piece of songwriting royalties was meant to be permanent.

  • February 21, 2024

    NY Judges Question Lehman's Bid To Undo CDS Trial Loss

    A panel of New York appeals court judges on Wednesday appeared reluctant to undo a bench trial loss Lehman Bros.' bankrupt European unit suffered last year in a suit attempting to clawback nearly half a billion dollars from Assured Guaranty over alleged losses on credit default swaps tied to the 2008 financial crisis.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Rejects $5.2M Atty Fee Bid In Poultry Farm Loan Suit

    A New York federal judge rebuffed attorneys' attempt to collect a nearly $5.2 million fee for representing an affiliate of two billionaire brothers that accused an investment adviser of fraudulently inducing the affiliate to provide a loan for a Russian poultry operation, saying the adviser wasn't improperly defending himself.

  • February 21, 2024

    Intel Patent Trial Delayed To Allow Time For Counterclaim

    A California federal judge agreed on Tuesday to postpone the latest legal showdown between patent litigation business VLSI and chipmaker Intel after lawyers in the case acknowledged they couldn't reach agreement on the case schedule.

  • February 21, 2024

    Former Exec Convicted Of Medtronic Insider Trading Scheme

    A Minneapolis man who tipped off a friend about his employer's secret negotiations on a $1.6 billion acquisition deal with medical device company Medtronic has been convicted of securities fraud and conspiring to commit insider trading, the Minnesota U.S. Attorney's Office has announced.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Won't Strike 'Excessive' $2.3M Tobacco TM Verdict

    A federal judge in Atlanta has said he won't reduce a $2.3 million verdict against two Georgia wholesalers of cigarette rolling paper accused of selling knockoffs, saying the jury's determination on the amount of the damages is "something the court cannot second-guess."

  • February 21, 2024

    WDTX Jury Clears Samsung In $4B Chip Patent Trial

    A Western District of Texas jury has cleared Samsung of infringing two semiconductor patents, following a trial in which the patent owner sought a record damages award of more than $4 billion.

  • February 21, 2024

    'No Theft' Of Eagles Lyrics, Trio Says As NY Trial Opens

    Three men accused of trying to sell stolen draft lyrics from the classic Eagles album "Hotel California" told a New York state judge presiding over their criminal bench trial on Wednesday that there was "no theft" and that prosecutors owed them an apology.

  • February 21, 2024

    Motorola Wants Rival's IP Use, Unpaid Royalties Investigated

    While Motorola defends its $540 million trade secret win against a major Chinese radio company at the Seventh Circuit, the tech giant asked an Illinois federal judge to look into whether its rival has continued using Motorola trade secrets without paying a royalty and should be held in contempt.

  • February 21, 2024

    Doc Keeps Trial Win In Suit Over Patient's Medication List

    A New York state appeals panel on Wednesday declined to grant a new trial to a widow who alleged her husband's doctor failed to tell his surgeon about his essential medications, saying the trial court did not allow the doctor to impermissibly pass the blame to defendants who'd already been dismissed from the case.

Expert Analysis

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

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