Food & Beverage

  • February 22, 2024

    Sanctions Bids By McDonald's, Byron Allen Cos. Look Cooked

    An attorney for McDonald's urged a Los Angeles judge on Thursday to reconsider a tentative ruling denying its motions for sanctions, saying attorneys for Byron Allen's media companies "knowingly" included false information in a complaint alleging the fast food giant lied in pledges to spend more advertising money on Black-owned media.

  • February 22, 2024

    Commerce's Intransigence Spurs 2nd Xanthan Gum Remand

    The U.S. Department of Commerce's continued refusal to provide a Chinese xanthan gum producer a chance to correct its customs data before issuing penalties called for a second remand in the case, a U.S. Court of International Trade judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Grubhub's Business Is 'Suffused With Deception,' LA Says

    Grubhub's business is "suffused with deception," Los Angeles County said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, claiming the food delivery service has long misled customers about prices and driver benefits and imposed "abusive" policies on restaurants.

  • February 22, 2024

    No Partnership In Hot Dog Eatery Deal, NC Court Rules

    A restaurateur has beaten a lawsuit that alleged he jilted an associate in a deal to buy hot dog eateries, with North Carolina's business court reasoning the two never had a legally binding partnership.

  • February 22, 2024

    Almond Grower's Early Ch. 11 Motions Get Wary OK

    A California bankruptcy judge gave cautious approval to a series of first day motions in the Chapter 11 case of almond grower Trinitas Farming LLC Thursday, saying he was wary of green lighting an interim debtor-in-possession order before a final credit agreement or a committee of unsecured creditors is in place.

  • February 22, 2024

    Biz Group Urges OECD Candidates To Back Digital Duties Ban

    The U.S. Council for International Business urged countries vying to be members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to support a global moratorium on digital tariffs that is set to expire in a week.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Can't Go It Alone Against Kroger Merger, Cos. Say

    Kroger and Albertsons have urged a judge to toss Washington state's "go-it-alone" bid to block their $24.6 billion merger deal, arguing the anti-competitive concerns raised by the state's attorney general are not a nationwide antitrust issue.

  • February 22, 2024

    Instant Brands Ch. 11 Plan Gets OK After Win In Supplier Row

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Thursday gave tentative approval to home-appliance maker Instant Brands' reorganization plan after finding that recent briefings from the company and a supplier supported his preliminary decision last week to preserve the debtor's indemnification rights.

  • February 22, 2024

    SD Winery Gets New Go At Hiring Foreign Kitchen Staff

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board on Wednesday revived a South Dakota winery's quest to temporarily hire foreign kitchen staff for its tourist season, faulting a certifying officer for giving the winery only one way to fix a hiring date discrepancy.

  • February 22, 2024

    Convicted Chicago Pol Seeks Acquittal Or New Trial

    One of Chicago's longest serving and most powerful local politicians asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to set aside a jury's December verdict convicting him of using his official position to steer tax business to his personal law firm, saying no rational jury could have convicted him based on the evidence presented at trial.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Judge Halts State Ag Law's Anti-Union Speech Restriction

    A New York federal judge paused enforcement of a section of a state agricultural labor law that would make it an unfair labor practice to discourage unionization, saying claims from a farming group that the provision violates the First Amendment have a chance of success.

  • February 22, 2024

    B. Riley Stands By Franchise Group Deal After Internal Review

    B. Riley Financial reaffirmed its commitment to the $2.6 billion take-private deal for Franchise Group Inc. despite the misconduct of former Franchise Group CEO Brian Kahn, saying on Thursday that its audit committee determined through a nine-week internal review that B. Riley had no knowledge of or involvement in the misconduct.

  • February 22, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Occidental, Kroger-Albertsons, BuzzFeed

    Occidental explores a $20 billion sale of Western Midstream, the FTC and some states could sue to block the $24.6 billion Kroger-Albertsons deal, and The Independent is taking over BuzzFeed's U.K. and Irish operations. Here, Law360 breaks down the notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 21, 2024

    Restaurant Software Co.'s $9M Investor Deal Gets 1st OK

    Shareholders in restaurant digital commerce software company Olo Inc. have received an initial green light for a $9 million deal to settle class action claims the company touted a soon-to-end partnership with fast-food chain Subway as an example of its success.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes, Mich., Feds Refute Great Lakes Fishing Challenge

    Several Native American tribes, the state of Michigan and the federal government have urged the Sixth Circuit to reject a sport fishing group's attempt to sink a tribal fishing pact for parts of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, arguing it strikes an appropriate balance between respecting tribal fishing rights and protecting the Great Lakes fisheries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

  • February 21, 2024

    Chipotle Swaps Gift Cards For 'Worthless' Vouchers, Suit Says

    A Chipotle customer hit the fast-food chain with a proposed class action in California federal court Tuesday, alleging the company is unjustly making hundreds of thousands of dollars by refusing to refund orders made with gift cards and instead offering disgruntled customers vouchers so limited that they're effectively "worthless."

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. AG Settles With DoorDash Over Marketing Data Sale

    DoorDash will pay $375,000 to resolve the California attorney general's claims that the food delivery service violated the state's landmark consumer privacy law by failing to clearly inform users of their ability to opt out of the sale of their personal information to a marketing vendor, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    SPAC To Delist After Failing To Close Merger With Food Biz

    Blank-check company Bite Acquisition Corp. on Wednesday revealed that it received a letter from the New York Stock Exchange saying that it has determined to begin proceedings to delist the company's common stock because it failed to complete a business merger within the specified time frame.

  • February 20, 2024

    FinCEN Details Owner Data Access Rules For Small Banks

    The U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network on Tuesday released a compliance guide for small financial firms on accessing and safeguarding company ownership information that their customers are required to report under recently implemented rules.

  • February 20, 2024

    Farms Say Workers Haven't Tied Them To Abusive Tactics

    Two agricultural companies look to escape claims that they trafficked a group of migrant workers, telling a Michigan federal court that the workers hadn't shown how they could have known that a recruiter used abusive tactics to obtain their labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs McDonald's Win Over 'Bad Faith' Hot Tea Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Tuesday ruled that a lower court correctly tossed a man's $13 million "bad faith" lawsuit alleging he was burned by a McDonald's worker in Illinois who threw hot tea at him.

  • February 20, 2024

    Tenn. Jury Sides With Cops Over Raids On Legal CBD Shops

    A Tennessee federal jury rejected claims that a county and local law enforcement engaged in a conspiracy to violate a CBD shop owner's civil rights by raiding and shuttering his and others' stores, despite allegedly knowing that the products he sold were legal under both state and federal law.

  • February 20, 2024

    WTO Says Revised Duties On Spanish Olives Still Out Of Line

    The World Trade Organization called on the U.S. to fix revised countervailing duties on Spanish olives, ruling Tuesday that the duties are still not in compliance with its 2021 decision rejecting the investigation that resulted in the tariffs.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fluoride Trial Judge Mulls 'Mixed' IQ Evidence In Closings

    A California federal judge questioned the EPA and environmental groups on studies linking fluoride exposure to lower IQs during bench trial closing arguments Tuesday, observing that there's a clear dose-response relationship at high levels of fluoride exposure, but at low levels, "the evidence is mixed — we've got evidence going both ways."

Expert Analysis

  • Why Biz Groups Disagree On Ending Chevron Deference

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    Two amicus briefs filed in advance of last month's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo highlight contrasting views on whether the doctrine of Chevron deference promotes or undermines the stable regulatory environment that businesses require, say Wyatt Kendall and Sydney Brogden at Morris Manning.

  • Key Lessons After A Rare R&W Insurance Ruling

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    The recent New York state court decision in Novolex Holdings v. Illinois Union Insurance is noteworthy as one of the rare judicial opinions arising in the context of representations and warranties insurance, serving to remind parties entering into R&W Insurance policies that they may not be immune from some doctrines unfavorable to insurers, say attorneys at Kramer Levin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Legislative And Litigation Trends In Environmental Advertising

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    Companies that tout their products' environmental benefits can significantly reduce the risk that they will face allegations of greenwashing by staying up to date on related Federal Trade Commission guidance, state requirements and litigation trends, say Raqiyyah Pippins and Kelsie Sicinski at Arnold & Porter.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

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    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Aldi Design Infringement Case Highlights Assessment Issues

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    The forthcoming English Court of Appeal decision in Marks and Spencer v. Aldi, regarding the alleged infringement of design rights, could provide practitioners with new guidance, particularly in relation to the relevant date for assessment of infringement and the weight that should be attributed to certain design elements in making this assessment, say Rory Graham and Georgia Davis at RPC.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Recent Laws Affect Foreign Purchase Of US Real Estate

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    Early diligence is imperative for U.S. real estate transactions involving foreign actors, including analysis of federal and state foreign investment laws implicated by the transaction, depending on the property's nature and location, the parties' citizenship, and the transaction's structure, say Massimo D’Angelo and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

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    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • A Refresher On Alcohol Sponsorships Before The Super Bowl

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    As millions of people will see in Super Bowl commercials Sunday, celebrity sponsorships continue to be a valuable tool for alcohol beverage marketers — and those looking to better target audiences must understand how regulation of the alcohol industry affects these deals, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Opinion

    Food Safety Bill Needed To Protect Kids From Heavy Metals

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    The recent announcement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hundreds of children may have been exposed to unsafe lead levels in applesauce highlights the continuing failure by Congress to pass legislation that would require baby food manufacturers to ensure safer levels of heavy metals in their products, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • What Brands Must Know For Calif. Recycle Label Compliance

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    A brand that stamps nonrecyclable packaging with the chasing arrows symbol could face liability under California's new law on labeling recyclable material, so brand owners should keep an eye on the state's pending survey process to identify which materials meet the criteria before requirements go into effect, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

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