Employment

  • February 22, 2024

    Athletes' NCAA Suit Will Wait For JPML

    College athletes fighting for a slice of the broadcasting profits their games earn will have to wait until the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation decides whether to consolidate their case with another similar suit before they continue briefing, a Colorado federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    No Early Win For Geothermal Co. Founder In Ownership Row

    A Colorado federal judge Thursday declined to give a geothermal startup founder an early win in a bitter fight over ownership of the company, concluding in an order that there are too many disputes over a noncompete agreement for the case to be resolved through summary judgment.

  • February 22, 2024

    Coldwell Banker Wins Trade Secrets Fight On Directed Verdict

    A California state judge issued a directed verdict for Coldwell Banker's Orange County division in a case where a rival real estate company accused it of poaching employees and stealing trade secrets.

  • February 22, 2024

    NLRB Joint Employer Rule Delayed Again Amid Biz Challenge

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday delayed until March an imminent National Labor Relations Board rule change that will make it tougher for employers to show they are not joint employers while the court mulls a business coalition's challenge.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fired Exec Says Conn. Hospital Booted Her For Her Age

    A former Waterbury Hospital executive is suing her ex-employer in Connecticut federal court, saying it posted her job on a career site while she was on medical leave and then fired her so the CEO could "replace her with someone younger and more attractive."

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Manager's Allies Get Embezzlement Sentences

    Three co-defendants of former Philadelphia union leader John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty have been sentenced for their participation in an embezzlement scheme spearheaded by the former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 business manager.

  • February 22, 2024

    Law Grad With Disabilities Wins Extra Time On Bar Exam

    A Colorado state judge has ordered the state's lawyer licensing authority to give a recent law school graduate with visual impairments and ADHD extra time to take the bar exam next week, finding the test-taker was likely to prove he needs the 50% time extension.

  • February 22, 2024

    9th Circ. OKs NLRB's Dues Stance, But Judge Decries Shifts

    A Ninth Circuit panel handed the National Labor Relations Board a pair of victories in a dispute over union dues, holding that valid dues authorization forms can be worded in a variety of ways and that employers can't suddenly stop deducting dues when a union contract expires.

  • February 22, 2024

    BNSF Says It Fired Conductor For Suspected Lies, Not Leave

    BNSF Railway Co. is urging a Washington federal court to dismiss claims that it fired a worker for using medical leave, arguing that the evidence shows the company honestly believed the worker misused leave as vacation days.

  • February 22, 2024

    UAW Tells Mich. Judge To Toss Fiduciary Duty Suit

    The United Auto Workers and one of its affiliates urged a Michigan federal judge to dismiss accusations that the union violated its fiduciary duty in connection with an individual's claim for benefits, saying federal retirement and labor laws preempt the plaintiff's allegations.

  • February 22, 2024

    Judge Irked By Arbitration Ask Years Into Au Pair Wage Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday twice lobbed the phrase "judge shopping" at lawyers for an au pair placement agency that, four years into a proposed collective wage action by former child care workers, now want the case sent to arbitration in Switzerland.

  • February 22, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Mayo Clinic Win In Race, Sex Bias Case

    The Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday declined to reinstate a case brought against Mayo Clinic by a Black former clinical specialty representative who alleged she was treated differently than white employees throughout her employment and later fired as a result of her race and gender.

  • February 22, 2024

    Longshore Union To Exit Bankruptcy With $20M Settlement

    A California bankruptcy judge Thursday approved the International Longshore and Warehouse Union's request to dismiss its own bankruptcy after okaying the union's settlement of a long-running legal dispute with a shipping company that had driven it into insolvency

  • February 22, 2024

    ABC Can't Beat Suit Over 'General Hospital' Antivax Firings

    A California state judge has refused to ax a religious discrimination claim against the ABC television network by crew members of "General Hospital" who unsuccessfully sought exemptions from its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, saying a jury should decide whether the plaintiffs were being honest about their religious beliefs when seeking accommodations.

  • February 22, 2024

    Google Says Worker's Poor Performance Dooms Age Bias Suit

    Google urged a Texas federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in a former sales manager's lawsuit alleging the company's push to replace older men with younger female workers cost him his job, saying the evidence shows he was cut loose for his poor performance.

  • February 22, 2024

    NJ Public Defender Gets Partial Win In Atty's Bias Case

    A New Jersey state judge on Thursday tossed several allegations against the state's Office of the Public Defender in a suit brought by a former employee alleging that she was forced to resign because of discrimination and a hostile work environment, ruling that she failed to provide the state agency with proper notice of her complaint.

  • February 22, 2024

    DraftKings Says Ex-Exec's $310K Attys Fees Bid Is Excessive

    DraftKings has told a California federal court that the "whopping" $310,000 in attorney fees requested by a former executive after the company shuffled the case back and forth between state and federal court is an unreasonable fee no "reasonable client" would pay.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Judge Halts State Ag Law's Anti-Union Speech Restriction

    A New York federal judge paused enforcement of a section of a state agricultural labor law that would make it an unfair labor practice to discourage unionization, saying claims from a farming group that the provision violates the First Amendment have a chance of success.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judge May Lose Law License Loss Challenge

    A Michigan magistrate judge recommended the dismissal of a former judge's suit alleging the state's judicial disciplinary board defamed her by denying the reinstatement of her law license.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fla. Whistleblower Suit Deal Averts Littler's Disqualification

    Littler Mendelson PC won't have to face a disqualification bid in Florida federal court over a firm attorney's purported use of a mistakenly produced, privileged document at a deposition after its client reached a settlement in a whistleblower retaliation suit, court records show.

  • February 22, 2024

    Hearst Lands Win Over Boston Videographer's Vax Claims

    A news videographer's concerns about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine fell short of qualifying as a sincerely held religious belief, according to a Boston federal judge whose ruling Thursday dismissed the fired employee's worries as mere personal judgments "rigged out with religious verbiage."  

  • February 22, 2024

    Narcoleptic Doc Unfit For Anesthesiology, 11th Circ. Holds

    The Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday upheld a win by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia in a discrimination lawsuit brought by a former anesthesiology resident, finding that the resident's narcolepsy diagnosis didn't change the fact that he "could not perform the essential functions of the job and posed a risk to patient safety."

  • February 21, 2024

    Columbia, Barnard Don't Protect Jewish Students, Suit Says

    Columbia University and Barnard College have a long history of allowing antisemitism to run rampant on their campuses and most recently have failed to protect Jewish students from harassment and violence following the Hamas-led killings in Israel on Oct. 7, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court in Manhattan.

  • February 21, 2024

    Morgan Stanley Bias Award Fight Belongs In NC, Judge Says

    A Morgan Stanley unit must challenge an arbitrator's conclusion that it discriminated against a white male former banker in North Carolina, where he last worked, a Georgia federal judge ruled, saying the arbitrator's presence in Atlanta during the virtual proceeding isn't enough to tether the case to the Peach State.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

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    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

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